good news #18
good news #16
2020.06.19 Lifestyle

good news #17

"Some people like flowers, others like florists; some people deal with things head on, others just bluff and whine.” We’re aren’t the one who said that; it was rapper Oxmo Puccino. And here, we deal with both. Hence, we’d like to introduce you to a few florists we think you should know.

Castor fleuriste
CASTOR’S GOT THE WHOLE WORLD IN HIS HANDS

Castor Fleuriste doesn’t need a tempting storefront. Rather, the artisan-florist Louis-Géraud Castor opted to officiate in a lovely and calm courtyard in a space that resembles a gallery more than a boutique. And if he has become, in just a few years, the go-to for anyone with taste, it’s because this former art dealer handles flowers (sourced only from local producers) the way others handle paintbrushes. The flowers are remarkably sculptural, especially when his creations are matched with those of ceramicists, both established and up-and-comers, like the atelier Jean Roger or Mathilde Martin. Proof that he is the florist of the moment? He’s the star of the visuals for the new collaboration between the extremely demanding retailer The Broken Arm, and outdoor brand Salomon.
Castor fleuriste 


Muse Montmartre
THE MUSE AMUSES HERSELF

His first Muse lived up high on the hills of the butte Montmartre and the second one set up shop in the Marais just before confinement. The Poet-Florist Majid Mohammad, originally from Tehran but a long-time Parisian, is clearly under their influence as can be seen in his curiosity cabinets and their generous compositions of dynamic coloured flowers housed in flea market vases. They look like fistfuls of flowers picked in the fields by an outsized imagination. An aesthetic already adopted by Ann Demeulemeester, Kris Van Assche and Maison Martin Margiela.
Muse Montmartre 


Nue Paris
NAKED, SHE’S NAKED I TELL YOU

Having set up shop in her grandfather’s artist atelier, Claire Boreau produces floral creations for Dior, 24 Sèvres, Delvaux, Kenzo and OAMC. The daughter, granddaughter, and great granddaughter of butchers was introduced to permaculture while visiting Rome on a romantic getaway and came back to France determined to make flowers her focus. Her style is marked mainly by compositions that are a touch monumental, or at least that engage viewers’ perceptions, in the vein of the Flemish Renaissance painters. Nue Paris


Pampa
NOT LOST IN THE PAMPA

At first sight, their joyful bouquets may look a bit phallic, yet they give any interior a terribly sleek air. But the concept that has really taken off at Pampa is the single weekly bouquet, which they create on their own and offer by special order only. One, and only one, at least when it comes to fresh flowers. Indeed, Emmanuelle Magnan and Noélie Balez also work with dry flowers, for beautifully lasting compositions. All delivered by bicycle in Paris, naturally, as a way of showing that it’s not only the flowers that are sustainable. Pampa


Le Cactus
THE WHOLE WORLD IS A CACTUS

It was while traveling across California that sisters Camille amd Pauline Laffargue succumbed to the charm of cacti. Once back in Paris, the absence of space and contact with nature encouraged them to found their own project. And so Le Cactus Club was born, a few steps away from the Canal Saint-Martin. In addition to plants, they also sell everything you need to make them happy, even in Parisian apartments with limited space, as well as offer classes that introduce participants to the floral arts. Currently, the creations of illustrator Florence Balducci are also flowering in the windows.  
Le Cactus Club


Christine lerche
from 1nstant.fr
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